Potomac Almanac Guide to The Potomac River

Potomac is bordered by more than 12 miles of the C&O Canal National Historical Park, including the towpath and the Potomac River. Living in Potomac provides opportunities to enjoy the sights and sounds of the river with outdoor activities ranging from an easy stroll to a challenging hike; a flat bike ride of a few miles to multi-day bike trips; rock climbing; world-class whitewater kayaking or a gentle paddle on flatwater. Wildlife is abundant and birders flock to the area. All outdoor areas of the C&O Canal National Historical Park are open daylight hours year round. Visitors pay an entrance fee at the entrance to Great Falls Tavern Visitors Center at Falls Road and MacArthur Boulevard, but access everywhere else is free. Three-day pass for a vehicle is $20; a person on foot, bicycle or horse is $10; motorcycle is $15; annual passes, lifetime and senior citizen passes are also available.

See https://www.nps.gov/choh/index.htm

Great Falls Tavern Visitor Center and Olmsted Overlook Visitors Center: Open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

11710 MacArthur Blvd.

301-767-3714

ABOUT THE FALLS:

From The Geologic Story of Great Falls and the Potomac River Gorge published by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1980: “In its seaward course, the Potomac River crosses many small rapids and cascades, but these are insignificant in comparison with the foaming fury of Great Falls, where the river drops 12 meters in about 180 meters and is channeled into a narrow rock-walled gorge less than 25 meters wide in places. In the summer the flow may be less than 38,000 liters a second, but during floods the flow commonly reaches 40 million liters a second. The average flow pouring over the falls is 349,000 liters of water every second and in a year, more than 9.5 trillion liters, enough water to flood the entire District of Columbia to a depth of 55 meters, converting the Washington Monument into a tall lighthouse.”

If you haven’t seen Great Falls, it’s time. Enter the C&O Canal National Historical Park at the intersection of Falls Road and MacArthur Boulevard. (See above.)

For up close views of Great Falls, walk 0.2 miles over the Olmsted Island Bridges to the overlook at the end. Bridges and boardwalks traverse a rare floodplain terrace environment, ending with an observation deck over the spectacular views of the Falls and the head of Mather Gorge.

INSIDER’S TIP

The Gold Mine Trail can be accessed at the top of the entrance to Great Falls, at the intersection of Falls Road and MacArthur Boulevard, or near the Great Falls Tavern Visitor’s center. Trails, which can be used for running or walking, include some steep inclines but are easier and shorter than the famous Billy Goat Trail. See the remains of an old building that was used from 1900- 1939 to mine gold.

MULE DRAWN BOAT RIDES

Take a trip back in time to the 1870s and ride along the historic C&O Canal in a boat pulled by mules, sometime in the future. Experience rising eight feet in a lock while park interpreters in period clothing describe what life was like for the families that lived and worked on the canal. The boat is not operating in 2020 due to the pandemic but stay tuned and remain optimistic that it will begin again in 2021.

BILLY GOAT TRAIL

Thousands hike the Billy Goat Trail every year, with access from the Old Angler’s site or from the Great Falls Tavern Visitors Center or Carderock. The loop between the C&O Canal and Potomac River is less than five miles long but has steep and rocky sections. Bring water and wear good walking shoes. No flip flops or ballet slippers. Allow plenty of time to stop and enjoy spectacular views of the cliffs, Potomac River passing through the gorge and sensitive vegetation and rare plants. This hike is marked by light blue trail blazes to keep visitors from trampling on Bear Island’s many rare plants and sensitive vegetation. The trail can be rough and rocky with steep climbs. But the trail is one of the most popular hikes in all of the metropolitan area, which can be done by people of all ages.

INSIDER’S TIP: The park service seeks volunteer trail stewards willing to hike parts of the trail, educate visitors at the trailheads, protect the natural resources of Bear Island, ensure visitors are prepared for the strenuous hike, share stories about the sensitive vegetation, and reduce trampling of the Bear Island’s many rare plants. Active trail stewards carry park radios for emergency communication and receive basic first aid training to help with minor injuries. http://www.chohvip.org/billy_goats/

CARDEROCK RECREATION AREA

Rock climbers visit Carderock daily for its famous cliffs. The recreation area includes playing fields, a large picnic pavilion available by reservation and access to the Potomac River and the Billy Goat Trail.

Reach this 200-acre part of the park from the Clara Barton Parkway at the Naval Surface Warfare exit.

INSIDER’S TIP: Get involved on the river by joining the Bike Patrol, becoming a Billy Goat Trail Steward, or volunteering to help run the Canal Boat, or serving as a docent at the River Center. The Level Walker Program is the most popular volunteer activity of the C&O Canal Association. There are 69 levels, defined by the association along the canal, which vary from 1.2 miles to 5.66 miles. Volunteers are expected to walk their assigned area and report at least once a year, preferably more. Level Walkers report on the condition of the towpath and any hazards they encounter by reporting to the Association.

See http://www.chohvip.org/

OLD ANGLER’S INN

Access the park across from Old Angler’s Inn, 10801 MacArthur Blvd., a Potomac institution since 1860 for users of the canal or for patrons interested in food, drinks or live music in an idyllic setting. Indoor and outdoor seating.

A popular spot for kayakers and stand-up paddleboarders, and a great spot to find outdoor adventure companies teaching beginning to advanced paddleboarding, kayaking and canoeing. Hiking enthusiasts have quick access to the Billy Goat Trail from here, or those who simply want to take an evening stroll or bike ride along the Burma Road or around Widewater, the area of the canal used for turning large boats around. Parking available across from the restaurant not at the restaurant.

See https://oldanglersinn.com/

10801 MacArthur Blvd.

301-365-2425

SWAIN’S LOCK

10700 Swain’s Lockhouse Road (off River Road)

Campsites are available at Swain’s Lock, one of the largest of the canal lockhouses. The lockhouse is named for Jess Swain, a lock-keeper in the early 1900s whose father helped in the excavation and construction of the canal. After running a boat rental and refreshment stand at Swain’s Lock for almost a century, the family ceased operations in 2006. Now part of Canal Quarters and available for overnight stays. Up to seven friends can spend up to three nights here, experiencing life on the canal. Lockhouse 21 is furnished to depict 1916 and tells the story of the Swain family, generations of whom helped build and run the C&O Canal.

https://www.canaltrust.org/programs/canal-quarters/

PENNYFIELD LOCK

End of Pennyfield Lock Road (off River Road)

The three-mile walk from Pennyfield Lock to Violette’s Lock takes you through many kinds of bird habitat and around Blockhouse Point. Pennyfield Lock was President Grover Cleveland’s favorite destination when he went on fishing excursions, according to the Potomac Master Plan. The Pennyfield Lock House, built in 1879 inland from the lock house, was the home of lock-keeper Charles W. Pennyfield.

INSIDER’S TIP: Pennyfield Lock is also home to a lockhouse built in 1830 that you can rent by the night. The Canal Quarters Interpretive Program invites visitors to stay in a historic lockhouse for a day and night to learn about the living conditions of a lockkeeper’s family.

See https://www.canaltrust.org/programs/canal-quarters/

BLOCKHOUSE POINT: INSIDER’S TREASURE

Those who know this 630 acres of land call Blockhouse Point the jewel of Potomac. The natural and cultural resources at Blockhouse Point are amongst the most valuable in the country. The park contains a variety of exceptional and rare habitat, including mature upland forest, floodplain forest, wetlands, streams and river-rock outcrops. Nine species of threatened, endangered or watchlist species of plants have been identified in the park, along with 25 species of fish, nine species of amphibians, four species of reptiles, 39 species of nesting birds and 10 species of mammals.

During the Civil War, the 19th Massachusetts Infantry built three blockhouses in 1862 to guard Violette’s Lock and Pennyfield Lock, taking advantage of panoramic views from Blockhouse Point. Union sentries kept watch for Confederate movements across the river and at area fords. Source: National Park Service http:// Newcomers & Community Guide See www.nps.gov/choh/planyourvisit

Blockhouse Point Conservation Park

14750 River Road

https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/blockhouse-point-conservation-park-trails/blockhouse-point-civil-war-experience/

INSIDER’S TIP: Montgomery County developed a brochure so people can walk the footsteps of Union Soldiers. Blockhouse Point is an area to enjoy peace, solitude, and an example of the natural and cultural resources of Potomac that rival the most valuable in the country.

VIOLETTE’S LOCK

Violette’s Lock Road (off River Road)

Violette’s Lock offers one of the more beautiful views of the sunset over the Potomac River.

RILEY’S LOCK

13025 Riley’s Lock Road (off River Road)

Riley’s Lock features a boat ramp on Seneca Creek, the busiest in Montgomery County, that allows easy access to a quiet and inviting part of the Potomac River for canoes, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and small motorboats. There is a new accessible kayak launch there. The Seneca Creek Aqueduct, opened in 1833 and made of red sandstone, allowed thousands of canal boats to move across Seneca Creek from 1833 to 1924, the year of the canal’s closing. The aqueduct was protected by Union garrisons during the Civil War.

COVID-19 UPDATES

Prior to visiting any parks or trails, visit https://www.montgomeryparks.org/COVID-19/

Potomac’s Parks: A Healthy Sampling

Potomac is home to a remarkable diversity of parks — national parks, state parkland, county parks, conservation parks, equestrian parks, parks with adaptive playgrounds, parks with trains, dog parks, parks with ice skating rinks, parks that offer access to the Potomac River where the water is flat and inviting, and parks that offer access to the Potomac River where the water can be deadly. Here, in an annual tradition, is our guide to much of what Potomac’s parks have to offer.

1 Carderock Recreation Area

See https://www.recreation.gov/

Search “Carderock Recreation Area Pavilion”

Reach this 200-acre part of the park from the Clara Barton Parkway at the Naval Surface Warfare exit. Rock climbers visit Carderock daily for its famous cliffs. The recreation area includes playing fields, a large picnic pavilion available by reservation and access to the Potomac River and different portions of the Billy Goat Trail.

2 Old Angler’s Inn Access

Across from 10801 MacArthur Blvd.

Between Carderock and Great Falls; visitors can get to the towpath and the River across from Old Angler’s Inn on MacArthur Boulevard. A popular spot for kayakers and stand-up paddleboarders.

3 BILLY GOAT TRAIL

Access from the Old Angler’s site or from the Great Falls Tavern Visitors Center or Carderock. Thousands hike the Billy Goat Trail every year, with access from the Old Angler’s site or from the Great Falls Tavern Visitors Center or Carderock. The loop between the C&O Canal and Potomac River is less than five miles long but has steep and rocky sections. No flip flops, please.

4 Great Falls Tavern Visitor Center and Olmsted Overlook

11710 MacArthur Blvd.

See https://www.nps.gov/choh/index.htm

5 Swain’s Lock

10700 Swain’s Lockhouse Road (off River Road)

Campsites are available at Swain’s Lock, one of the largest of the canal lockhouses. The lockhouse is now part of the canal quarters program.

See https://www.canaltrust.org/programs/canal-quarters/

6 Pennyfield Lock

End of Pennyfield Lock Road (off River Road)

Pennyfield Lock was President Grover Cleveland’s favorite destination when he went on fishing excursions, according to the Potomac Master Plan. Built in 1879.

7 Lockhouse 8

6100 Clara Barton Parkway

From the south, "Seven Locks" (locks 8-14) raise the C&O Canal more than 50 feet in a little over a mile as it approaches the American Legion Bridge at the Washington Beltway. Lock 8 is the beginning of this large scale uplifting of the canal. This lock was also the first lock built using red sandstone from the quarry at Seneca.

8 Blockhouse Point Conservation Park

14750 River Road

Those who know this 630 acres of land call Blockhouse Point the jewel of Potomac. The natural and cultural resources at Blockhouse Point are amongst the most valuable in the country.

9 Violette’s Lock

End of Violette’s Lock Road (off River Road)

Violette’s Lock offers one of the more beautiful views of the sunset over the Potomac River.

10 Riley’s Lock

13025 Riley’s Lock Road (off River Road)

Riley’s Lock features a boat ramp on Seneca Creek, the busiest in Montgomery County, that allows easy access to a quiet and inviting part of the Potomac River for canoes, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and small motorboats.

11 Adventure Conservation Park

10801 Glen Road, Potomac

This 14-acre neighborhood conservation area, established in 1969, includes areas set aside for bird-banding.

12 Falls Road Golf Course

10800 Falls Rd.

301-299-5156

https://www.mcggolf.com/

Falls Road Golf Course was completed in 1961 on 150 acres of former farmland, and includes an 18-hole course renovated in 2003, plus a clubhouse and driving range. The course measures slightly more than 6100 yards from the back tees and plays to a par 70. Reserve tee times online.

13 Cabin John Regional Park

7400 Tuckerman Lane

www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-andtrails/cabin-john-regional-park/

This 528-acre park centrally located offers an Adventure playground, miniature train rides, dog park, picnic areas, campgrounds, nature center, a Tai Chi court, hiking and nature trails. Shirley Povich Field, one of several ball fields, is home to the Bethesda Big Train Summer Collegiate Baseball team and the Georgetown University baseball team, and seats 750. Other sports facilities include a lighted baseball field, five softball fields (one lighted), four lighted tennis practice walls, nine lighted tennis courts, a pee-wee soccer field, four single wall handball courts and one volleyball court and horseshoe pit.

14 Locust Grove Nature Center

7777 Democracy Boulevard

301-765-8660

https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/cabin-john-regional-park/

Hike the upper meadow of the Locust Grove Nature Center and look for monarch butterflies and caterpillars, listen for wrens and bluebirds, or watch for box turtles crossing the path in the early morning. Wander to the Lower Meadow and watch bats in the late afternoon, sit under the shade of a 200-year-old sycamore and spot minnows, crayfish, bathing birds or beaver activity in the Cabin John Creek. Locust Grove offers programs featuring local natural and cultural history for children, teens and adults.

Note: Because of the pandemic, the nature center building is temporarily closed.

15 Robert C. McDonell Campground

7701 Tuckerman Lane

See https://www.montgomeryparks.org/ for permits

16 Cabin John Ice Skating Rink

10610 Westlake Drive

https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/cabin-john-regional-park/cabin-john-ice-rink/ 301-765-8620

An assortment of programs including lessons and rental times. Note: Because of the pandemic, all participants must have a completed COVID-19 Waiver to be allowed entrance. See the website for details.

17 Pauline Betz Addie Tennis Center

7801 Democracy Boulevard

301-765-8650

Features six indoor tennis courts, a lounge area, and two locker rooms with showers. Professional on-site racquet restringing and regripping is also available. Private and group lessons and seasonal court rentals.

Note: The tennis center is open during the pandemic. See https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/cabin-john-regional-park/indoor-tennis-center/ for details.

18 C.P. Huntington Miniature Train

7410 Tuckerman Lane

301-765-8670 Train Information

The miniature train is a replica of an 1863 C.P. Huntington, a locomotive purchased by the Southern Pacific Railroad, with five passenger cars, and carries visitors on a ten-minute, two-mile ride through the park. Note: Because of the pandemic, the train is currently closed.

Dog Park

10900 Westlake Drive

Located near the miniature train, this half-acre dog park is enclosed allowing dogs to run and exercise off-leash. The facility is open 9-5 p.m. Dog-park users are encouraged to use the Westlake Drive parking lot. Dogs should be on a leash before entering and exiting the park.

Tai Chi Court

7400 Tuckerman Lane

The Tai Chi Court at Cabin John Regional Park is the first Tai Chi court in Montgomery County and joins only a few of its kind in the nation. Built through a public/private partnership between MNCPPC, Montgomery Parks and the Wu Wei Tai Chi Club, the Tai Chi court is a 48-foot-diameter circle of flagstone incorporating the shape of a yin/yang symbol and surrounded by benches in a serene natural setting.

19 Hadley’s Playground at Falls Road

12600 Falls Rd.

Falls Road Local Park, which showcases the award-winning Hadley’s Park, allows all youth to play together. In 1986, the park system acquired the 20-acre park, including soccer, baseball and other sports fields. Hadley’s Park is fully accessible, and its accessible theme, equipment, design and surface, have been emulated by approximately 250 playgrounds across the country to allow people with all abilities to play together. The baseball field and other amenities at Falls Road Local Park are made possible by the support of Bethesda Chevy Chase Baseball.

20 Potomac Horse Center

14211 Quince Orchard Rd.

potomachorse.com

301-208-0200

County-owned and privately run, this large facility offers lessons at all levels year round, summer camp, birthday parties and special events. Featuring riding classes for “Mini Mites” (5-8 year old children) through adults of all levels, including therapeutic horseback riding. Classical Dressage, Combined Training, and a Hunter/Jumper program are available with riders competing under different trainers.

Note: The pandemic has stopped shows and other events this year, but in-house clinics and more are still available. See the website for details.

21 Rockwood Manor Educational Center and Special Park

11001 MacArthur Boulevard

301-563-7510

https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/rockwood-manor-park/

Built in the 1920s, the Manor was the former country estate of Carolyn Gangwer Caughey. Set on 30 acres of woods and adjacent to the C&O Canal, Rockwood Manor offers a secluded and naturally beautiful venue, and has hosted first-ladies, international diplomats, and was the site of the National Girls Scout Camp . Rockwood Manor’s overnight lodgings are available for destination weddings, multi-day business retreats or training sessions, family reunions, workshops, weekend or weekday getaways and other events. Facilities for weddings, meetings, with overnight accommodations and dormitories for youth groups.

22 Buck Branch Neighborhood Park

8704 Bells Mill Road Acquired in 1986, 7.1 acre park with colorful playground, youth soccer field, and lighted tennis courts.

23 Avenel Local Park

10551 Oaklyn Drive

Acquired in 1989. The 20.7 acre park features three tennis courts, two basketball courts, three soccer fields and a softball field and playground.

24 Heritage Farm Neighborhood Park

9520 Hall Road

Acquired in 1970. This 30-acre park sits near the intersection of River and Falls Roads. The park features a playground, soccer field, two tennis courts, and basketball court.

25 Potomac Community Neighborhood Park and Community Center

11301 Falls Rd.,

Acquired in 1976.This 5.3-acre park features a playground, a lighted baseball field, and lighted tennis courts. It sits adjacent to the Potomac Community Center, currently closed because of the pandemic, but a must visit site for all Potomac residents, and especially youth.

26 Fox Hills West Neighborhood Park

12710 North Commons Way

Acquired in 1969. The 2.2-acre park includes a playground, tennis court, basketball court and open gazebo.

27 Bedfordshire Neighborhood Park

11416 Bedfordshire Ave.

Acquired in 1968. This 7.8-acre park includes a playground and open space for recreation and entertainment.

28 Glen Hills Local Park

12511 Circle Drive

Acquired in 1966. The 25.2-acre park features a playground, two softball fields, an overlay football field, two lighted tennis courts, and a picnic area.

29 Gregerscroft Neighborhood Park

12021 Gregerscroft Rd.

Acquired in 1969. Provides the Glen Oaks and Potomac Green neighborhoods with a playground and natural surface trail. The area is wooded and nearby Watts Branch Stream Valley Park.

30 Tilden Woods Local Park

6800 Tilden Lane

Acquired in 1961. The 7-acre park includes a playground, two lighted tennis courts, a softball field, basketball court and a picnic area. The Tilden Woods Park Activity Building, which includes kitchen facilities, can accommodate up to 96 people once the pandemic is over.

31 Seven Locks Local Park

6922 Seven Locks Road

Acquired in 1974. The 11.6-acre park features a playground, soccer field, lighted tennis courts and a sheltered picnic area.

32 Cabin John Local Park

7401 MacArthur Boulevard

Acquired in 1933. The six-acre park features a playground area, accessible softball field, accessible multi-use field, accessible and lighted tennis courts, accessible basketball court, and accessible picnic area.

33 Potomac Community Center

11315 Falls Road

240-777-6960

https://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/rec/

This is Montgomery County’s busiest community center, providing a variety of recreation activities for all ages such as open gym, arts and crafts, exercise/ leisure classes, group support meetings and socials, senior adult activities through the Potomac neighborhood, Senior program, area and county-wide sports programs, summer camps, programs for individuals with special needs, children and adult holiday parties, volunteer opportunities and more. Facilities include a gymnasium, exercise room, meeting rooms, art room, lounge area, community room and social hall. The outdoor area includes two baseball fields, lighted basketball and tennis courts, and a former in-line hockey rink. The Center offers table tennis, billiards and foosball, a gymnasium, weight room, social room, meeting rooms, and hundreds of classes through the Montgomery County Recreation Department.

Note: All Montgomery County community and recreation centers are currently closed because of the pandemic.

34 Bette Carol Thompson Scotland Community Center

7700 Scotland Drive

301-777-8075

Now named the Bette Carol Thompson Scotland Community Center, the rebuilt facility opened in November 2014. The center is located within the 10-acre Scotland community, between Seven Locks Road and I-270, which is a community that originated as one of the earliest African American settlements in Montgomery County.The community's 100 townhomes now house a diverse and multicultural population within the larger Potomac area. The center offers residents of all ages a variety of programs and experiences. Among them are yoga, sports, cooking, music, dance, community celebrations and seasonal events. A larger gymnasium and modern interiors are a focal point. Upgrades to the site include improved landscaping and parking, meeting green building and sustainability goals; energy guidelines, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

35 Glen Echo National Park

7300 MacArthur Blvd.

https://glenechopark.org/

Originally a Chautauqua retreat, then an amusement park, Glen Echo National Park now hosts a variety of arts, environmental and history programs. Classes are offered in pottery, painting, photography, glass art, silversmithing, textiles and other arts, as well as in dance, writing and music. The famous 1921 Dentzel Carousel in the center of the park has been giving rides to the public for 90 years. Adventure Theatre https://adventuretheatre-mtc.org/, 301-634-2270) is one of the area’s longest running children’s theater companies, and the Puppet Co. Playhouse (http://www.thepuppetco.org/) offers shows as well as was for children to be involved.

Note: Glen Echo Park has some live streaming and recorded classes, virtual exhibitions, activity downloads for kids, Facebook Live events, and more while activities are limited because of the pandemic. See website for details.

36 McKee Beshers Wildlife Management Area

Located on River Road in Western Montgomery County

Most everyone knows about the sunflower fields in McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area, a 2,000-acre tract in a mixture of woodlands, fields, wooded bottomland and managed wetland impoundments (green-tree reservoirs). The wildlife management area shares a common boundary with the National Park Service Chesapeake and Ohio Canal to the south and borders Seneca Creek State Park, a 1,200-acre public hunting area, on the east. McKee-Beshers WMA provides habitat for a great diversity of wildlife species including deer, wild turkey, waterfowl, over 200 species of songbirds, and numerous reptiles and amphibians. Biologists deliberately flood forests during the fall and winter in “greentree reservoirs.” These attract colorful wood ducks as well as other waterfowl which migrate through or spend the winter here. Hikers will find trails for miles and miles, meandering through the forests, fields and wetlands. Hunters enjoy the pursuit of white-tailed deer, wild turkey, woodcock, squirrels, waterfowl and many other species. Roads are maintained and suitable for hiking, nature photography, birding, hunting and other recreational activities. Visitors to the management area should be aware of biting insects, mosquitoes and ticks from April-December. Area is wet most of the year, wear appropriate footwear.

37 Serpentine Barrens Conservation Park North

Piney Meeting House Road

Serpentine Barrens Conservation Park is made up of three units: East, North and South. The units total more than 350 acres.

38 Serpentine Barrens Conservation Park

The Serpentine Barrens Natural Area is considered one of the most important natural areas in the county because of its unique geology and plant community. Serpentine ecosystems are globally rare and occur intermittently in an arc east of the Appalachian Mountains from Alabama to Maine. The trees are unusually small relative to their age because of the challenging growing conditions of serpentine soils. Therefore, forests appear to be early successional, but in reality are in a climax condition. Oaks as old as 175 years old will have a diameter of trees you would expect to be one or two decades old. More than 60 species of birds have been detected in the park, including a significant number of forest interior dwelling species such as Louisiana waterthrush, scarlet tanager, ovenbird, pileated woodpecker, and barred owl.

39 Callithea Farm Special Park

15000 River Road

https://www.montgomeryparks.org/parks-and-trails/callithea-farm-special-park/

Callithea Farm Park is a 97-acre property located adjacent to the M-NCPPC equestrian trails at Blockhouse Point Conservation Park and the C&O Canal. Horse boarding is available.

40 Highland Stone Neighborhood Park

8716 Post Oak Road

Acquired in 1975. This 2.5-acre park serves the Highland neighborhood with a playground, gazebo and short walking path. This park is maintained without the use of pesticides.

C&O Canal Explorer: Mobile App for Self Exploration

A mobile app, “C&O Canal Explorer,” will aid users in exploring the 184.5 miles and 20,000 acres of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. The mobile app includes over 600 points of interest in the park mapped in a searchable format, allowing users to find at-a-glance hiking trails, historic sites, trailheads, parking and more. The app also calculates the distance from a user’s location to nearby amenities and points of interest, with the ability to view both upstream and downstream of a current location. The app was developed by the C&O Canal Trust, the official nonprofit partner of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, which works in partnership with the National Park Service and local communities to raise funds to preserve the park for future generations.

See https://www.canaltrust.org/plan/explorer-mobile-app or download from your app store.

Log in to comment